Prisoners in the Promised Land The Ukrainian Internment ↠ PDF autowiringdiagram.co

Anya and her family have made a difficult journey to Canada in search of a new life But soon after they arrive in the land they hoped would welcome them World War I is declared and Ukrainians are considered “enemy aliens” — many of them sent away to internment camps Anya must find a way to deal with the challenges in the land she now calls home


10 thoughts on “Prisoners in the Promised Land The Ukrainian Internment Diary of Anya Soloniuk

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    Reason for Reading I am reading this whole series I picked this particular volume because I am participating in a WWI reading challengeI've only read a couple of Skrypuch's books so far but she has become one of my favourite Canadian juvenile authors Mostly her historical fiction revolves in some way around Ukrainians as that is where her heritage comes from and her own family genealogy is always a great starting point Skrypuch does write about other topics but this recurring theme is interesting as it is unique Once again I have learned something new from one of Marsha's books I had no knowledge whatsoever of the Ukrainian internment camps in Canada during WWI of course everybody knows of the Japanese ones during WWII but why not the earlier Ukrainian ones? Perhaps because they make very little sense at all from a political point of view This book is a fantastic read While it takes place primarily in Canada it does start with the boat trip to the new land the WWI story is told through the newspapers and discussions of the Ukrainian people as they sit caught in the middle of this war Their homeland is the battlefield in Eastern Europe for a long period of time and yet the Ukrainians are neither friends with the AustriansGermans who own their land or the Russians who invade it All news they hear is bad because whether it is the Allies or the enemy winning on their homeland it means their people friends relatives are in danger and dying Through the news the family receives and letters from home and friends across Canada until letters are halted due to the War Measures Act we get to see a side of WWI which I've never experienced before All my WWI reading has been about the trench warfare in FranceGermany It was very different in Eastern Europe especially there in Galicia a Ukrainian area owned by Austria Hungary which became part of the USSR later on and finally was reunited as part of present day UkraineThe Ukrainians were interred in camps mostly because CanadianBritish citizens confused them with Austrians the enemy and were ignorant and intolerable of them living within their society Anya's mother and father loose their jobs for patriotic reasons She leaves school to work for the family but eventually after the men are taken away to camps the women share rat infested flats have very little to eat are not safe on the streets on their own and are exposed to all sorts of vile racist comments making life a living hell When the family is moved to the internment camp in some ways life is better for them they are together again as a family it's cleaner they have nicer living quarters are fed don't face as much of the racism etc but it is a prison and therefore they have lost their freedom Another compelling page turner for me as we get to learn about the war in Eastern Europe life for the Ukrainian immigrants on the homefront and finally life inside the internment camps Very interesting and new to me information As usual the Epilogue in these books describes what happened to the characters afterwards and the Historical Note is a goldmine of true facts These are always my favourite part of the books in this series along with the contemporary photographs in the back This is one of my favourites in the Dear Canada series so far And I would love to read on this topic